‘Not a big deal’ claim police, reject UN call for snake probe – West Papua No.1 News Portal
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‘Not a big deal’ claim police, reject UN call for snake probe

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Illustration. -Pixabay.com

Papua, Jubi – Papua Regional Police public information head Assistant Superintendent Suryadi Diaz is asking all parties not to dramatise or make a big issue out of the use of a snake during an interrogation by police.

The statement was made in response to calls by United Nations human rights experts for an investigation into the use of the snake.

“The problem’s already been resolved, so there’s no need to make a big deal out of it anymore,” Diaz told CNN Indonesia.

Diaz said the investigation conducted by the Papua Regional Police Professionalism and Security Affairs Division (Propam) into the case had already been completed.

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“Propam has already dealt with the case, so it’s resolved,” he said.

Nevertheless, Diaz did not explain the results of the investigation or what sanctions would be given to the officers involved.

Speaking to journalists earlier, however, Diaz said there were several sanctions that could be applied including a written reprehend, a maximum one-year postponement of education, a postponement in regular wage increases, a postponement of one promotional period or a transfer and demotion.

Heaviest sanction

In addition to this, the heaviest sanction that can be given to officers who violate discipline is to be released from their posts or be assigned to a specific location for a maximum of 21 days.

Several UN human rights experts have urged Indonesia to investigate allegations of violence by the police and military in Papua related to the use of the snake during an interrogation.

“We urge the Indonesian government to take firm measures to prevent the excessive use of force by police and military officials involved in law enforcement in Papua,” read a statement by the UN experts.

“We are also deeply concerned about what appears to be a culture of impunity and general lack of investigations into allegations of human rights violations in Papua,” they said in the statement.

The experts, who are made up of UN special rapporteurs, also said that Papuans had been treated in “cruel, inhuman and degrading” ways.

Jayawijaya District Police Chief Deputy Senior Commissioner Tonny Ananda Swadaya claimed that it was the police officers’ own initiative to conduct the interrogation into the theft using a python.

According to Swadaya, however, it was just trick used during the interrogation so that the perpetrator would confess to their crimes. He also asserted that the snake used to frighten the suspect was a pet snake that was not poisonous and tame.

“This ended up going viral on social media, it’s been blown out of proportion in other parts of the country. Here [in Papua] the public is supportive. A tame snake, non-poisonous, it didn’t bite [the suspect] and after being given the snake, the thief admitted to the crime,” said Swadaya. (pmc.aut.ac.nz/CNN Indonesia)

 

Source: Pasific Media Centre

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A story of Nduga refugees: giving birth in the jungle

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Illustration of refugees. -Jubi/Pixabay.com

Jayawijaya, Jubi – The shooting over some construction workers of PT Istaka Karya in Yigi, Nduga Regency on 2 December 2018 has still left a scarce in the heart of local people. They are now still living with physical and mental injuries.

Among many innocent victims and refugees, there is a young woman who is leaving with trauma. She previously chose to not living her village located in Mugi sub-district when the incident occurred in the early of December 2018. But the twenty-one aged woman had to make a decision. With six children whom one was still inside her womb, at that time she was in two months pregnant, she must flee to a safer place.

“My husband went first and took two our children to a safer place,” she told Jubi in a refugee camp settled in Jayawijaya on Saturday (3/8/2019).

But when her village was surrounded with gunfire and house burning, terrifying she decided to take her other three children to the forest since January 2019. Like other refugees, she and her family eat what they could find in the jungle to survive. “Sometimes, we ate leaves or whatever we can fund to stay alive,” she said.

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She lived for nearly six months in the jungle that made her not aware of her time to give birth. One day she experienced bleeding and chose to take a rest. Then in the evening, she gave birth to a boy without assistance from anyone. “The baby was born under a big tree. I was alone. My family came when it just has done,” she said.

Because of a difficult time while in the jungle, she thought her baby was not safe in her womb. “I thought this boy already dead. But when I pushed my belly down, he still alive. It’s all God blessing,” she said.

After taking birth, she took fern leaves that she found in the jungle to wrap her baby’s body. If the weather was remarkably cold, she counts on the campfire and would hold him close to her body. After spending days in the jungle with her baby, she continued to walk and arrived in her family’s house in Jayawijaya where she lives now in June 2019.

When Jubi came to see her, her son remains not wearing clothes. She admitted that she and her family still do not want to accept the government’s aid because the military helps its distribution. Until now, she is still traumatic seeing soldiers.

“I witnessed the soldiers shot my family. It made me scared of them. Soon when they heard gunfire, people run away. But I witnessed that incident. I am traumatized by the sound of gunfire,” she said.

Now, she only counts on her breast milk to feed her son, though sometimes it’s not enough.

Meanwhile, another woman who came to the refugee camp earlier said she and the other three families flee because soldiers have come to their village.

“We had to sleep in a cave. There was no tent or shelter to cover us. After we felt a bit safer, we built a hut from woods and leaves in the jungle. While for food, we counted on leaves we found to be cooked” she said.

For this article, Jubi met a woman who was also pregnant when fleeing from her village and gave birth to her eighth child in the forest. “My baby is a girl. She was born in the refugee shelter,” she said.

Every day she saw the armed conflict between the Papua liberation army and the Indonesian military. Like other refugees, she and her family also count on what they found to survive.

“When I was tired to walk while in the running to avoid gunfire, I ever thought it was fine if I got shot but not my child. She must stay alive even I was shot dead,” she said. (*)

Reporter: Islami Adisubrata
Editor: Pipit Maizier

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Papuan students’ rally protesting New York Agreement in Malang ended in a riot

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Papuan students during a peace demonstration in Malang. – Jubi/Dok AMP

Jayapura, Jubi – Students joined the Papuan Student Alliance (AMP) and People’s Front of Indonesia conducted a peace rally in Malang on Thursday morning (15/8/2019). The protest ended in a riot after a local mob came to the scene.

John Gobay, the Chairman of Central AMP, confirmed the incident involved a local mob and Papuan students in Malang. He said it occurred at around 9:00 p.m. at the local time when the students conducted a rally in Jalan Basuki Rahmat approached by the local mob.

“The mob shouted at the students. They have beaten them with helmet, mocked and called them with some animal’s name. They also threw stones and kicked the students. Police were there when the incident happened, but they did not do anything. They only asked the mob to disperse when they saw some students have injured because of the torture,” said Gobay.

According to him, five students reportedly injured. Further, he admitted that some students also threw the stones back the mob. “Some protesters threw back the stones. The police were already on the scene with three motorbikes and a police truck,” he said. However, some police personnel on the scene later grew.

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“They then directed the injured students to get on the police ambulance though there was an ambulance from a public hospital,” said Gobay.

Besides the police, he said a military vehicle came to the scene. The truck drove racing and almost hit the protesters. “One of the protesters were arrested by the police, while our friend Niko Jigibalom was still reportedly missing.”

Meanwhile, an activist who involved in the rally, Pangkrasia Yeem, explained the rally is to protest against the New York Agreement which considered a beginning of many human rights violations in Papua. The New York Agreement is a treaty signed by the Netherlands and Indonesian Governments on 15 August 1962. “Papua becomes integrated with Indonesia because of a unilateral agreement between Indonesia and the Netherlands,” said Yeem.

He also accused this agreement had neglected the right of indigenous Papuans when it was signed. “The New York Agreement is a treaty of fraud, an instrument of annexation, murder and genocide against the West Papuan Nation by scarifying West Papuans. Therefore, we ask the governments of the Netherlands, Indonesia, and the United States as well as the United Nations to take responsibility immediately for the people of West Papua,” explained Yeem.

In this sense, Gobay said the statement that Indonesia has taken control over Papua was not a mistake. Indonesia had violated the New York Agreement, which stated that the Papua’s self-determination in 1969 should involve all Papuans. Ironically, Indonesia also signed a contract with Freeport McMoRan on 7 April 1967.

“The contract with Freeport signed before the public vote of 1969 conducted. In 1969, there were 809.337 Papuans who recorded as legal voters, but the vote ended with1, 026 voters who had previously been quarantined by the Indonesian Government. Therefore, on the 56th anniversary of the New York Agreement, we demand the Jokowi-Kalla administration, the Netherlands, the United States as well as the United Nations to immediately grant the right to self-determination for Papuan people,” said Gobay.

Furthermore, the Papuan protesters also urge the Government of Indonesia to immediately close down the mining activities of giant transnational companies in Papua, including Freeport, BP and LNG Tangguh. They also ask the United States to be responsible for advocating the New York Agreement that accused as the gate of oppressive acts by the Indonesian security force against Papuans.

Moreover, in their protest, the students asked the Government of Indonesia to determine Papua as a free military zone and to guarantee the freedom of Papuans to gather and express their opinion in public. They also asked the government to allow foreign journalists to cover the issue of Papua. Lastly, the students expressed their supports towards the Pacific Islands Forum (PIF) that conducted on 13-16 August 2019 in Tuvalu. In this forum, the Pacific leaders are planning to address the West Papua issue. (*)

Reporter: Hengky Yeimo
Editor: Pipit Maizier

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WWF conduct community forest management training

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A facilitator from the Papua Provincial Forestry Office during a presentation. – Jubi / David Sobolim

Jayapura, Jubi – The World Wide Fund for Nature or WWF-Indonesia conducted training for indigenous people to manage their customary forests.

The training was a response to illegal logging occurred in Papua as well as illegal timber companies who take benefits on timber sales in Papua by purchasing wood at a low price then selling in in the market with the higher price.

To address this issue, WWF-Indonesia held a specific training on wood harvesting planning technique using the Reduced Impact Logging (RIL) method on Tuesday, 13 August 2019, in Jayapura. Participated in the training were indigenous people holding a Business License for the Utilization of Indigenous Forest Timber Products (IUPHHKA-MA) whom members of Koperasi Serba Usaha (KSU-a cooperative).

Piter Roki Aloisius, the Northern Papua Landscape Manager of WWF-Indonesia, told Jubi that WWF involved seven groups of the provincial legal timber business permits holders who are accompanied by WWF in this training.

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“There are 13 groups, but not all working due to the implementation of Governor Regulation No. 13 on the Business Permit for the Utilization of Customary Community Timber Forest Product. Also, there is no synchronization between the provincial government and the central government related to the Forestry Law Number 41 of 2019 with Perdasus (special regional law) Number 21 of 2010 in Papua Province, “he said.

The seven KSUs and an ecotourism business group of WWF’s fostering groups are located in various regencies. They are KSU Mo Make Unaf from Merauke, KSU Jibogol from Jayapura, KSU Nafa from Nabire, KSU Kumea Ampas from Keerom, KSU Sapusaniye from Sarmi, and KSU Kornu and KSU Year Asai from Yapen Island Kepulauan Yapen, with the total of concession area of 33,691 hectares, whereas the ecotourism group Rhepang Muaif is located in Nimbonkrang Sub-district of Jayapura Regency.

So far, no coordination was made regarding the issuance of NSPK. However, while waiting for the issuance of NSPK, Aloysius said that WWF is responsible for fostering the established group by providing technical assistance.

“So, these groups will understand why they cannot carry out activities until now. However, by the time they got their NSPK, they will ready to manage their forests independently in sustainably and responsibly manners. Also, after this training they will understand how to manage the timber and forest products properly by reducing the impacts of its utilization,” he said.

He also explained that so far indigenous Papuans were not visibly utilizing their forest products. However, he believes that through a series of training and mentoring, indigenous people can take an initiative to carry out customary forest management.

“In Papua, if indigenous people process can process their timber by themselves, their daily income will higher,” he said.

According to him, the local community sell woods from the customary forest at the price ranging of Rp 300 thousand per tree, but a businessman sells the wood to the city market at a higher price. So, the local community loses twice because of this businessman.

“Community empowerment to improve the welfare of indigenous peoples is not only the responsibility of NGOs but also the government,” he said.

Meanwhile, Andreas Simoberef from KSU Tetom Jaya in Sarmi Regency said after being accompanied by WWF, he had opened a furniture industry. The income from this industrial business is higher than selling wood at a low price and the forest is being damaged, while it needs decades to growing trees.

He just opened this business for a year and found enthusiastic demand. Therefore, he is unable to serve all orders in a month. “This is a sign that indigenous peoples should not sell the wood. If indigenous peoples carry the timber management by themselves, they earn more income,” he said. (*)


Reporter: David Sobolim
Editor: Maizier Pipit

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